Women's testosterone supplements

But other experts question whether it’s fair to equate the experience of trans women—who were born biologically male—with the experience of intersex women. “These are two different populations that don’t have comparable physiologies, so we can’t extrapolate from one group to the other,” Karkazis says. Yes, some intersex runners have lost speed after medically suppressing their testosterone levels, but Karkazis thinks other factors are at play. Drugs to suppress testosterone have side effects that affect metabolism and hydration, and that could slow an athlete down. A runner’s performance may also take a hit from the psychological toll of being outed to the world as intersex. “I have been subjected to unwarranted and invasive scrutiny of the most intimate and private details of my being,” Semenya wrote in 2010.

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The ovary’s primary androgen is testosterone. Testosterone is produced by specialized cells in the follicles which surround the eggs, the theca cells. In women with PCOS, the theca cells are overactive and proliferate excessively, producing too much testosterone. As the follicles are often poorly developed in women with PCOS, they lack enough of another important component, the granulosa cells. The granulosa cells normally take testosterone and convert it into estrogen, in a process known as aromatization. In women with PCOS, the aromatzation process is not effective due to the poor development of the granulosa cells, and as such, there is a buildup of testosterone which was produced by the ovary.

Women's testosterone supplements

women's testosterone supplements

The ovary’s primary androgen is testosterone. Testosterone is produced by specialized cells in the follicles which surround the eggs, the theca cells. In women with PCOS, the theca cells are overactive and proliferate excessively, producing too much testosterone. As the follicles are often poorly developed in women with PCOS, they lack enough of another important component, the granulosa cells. The granulosa cells normally take testosterone and convert it into estrogen, in a process known as aromatization. In women with PCOS, the aromatzation process is not effective due to the poor development of the granulosa cells, and as such, there is a buildup of testosterone which was produced by the ovary.

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